Make Art / Stop AIDS

Make Art / Stop AIDS collaborates with Sex Squads at UCLA

Make Art / Stop AIDS collaborates with Sex Squads at UCLA

We have been training squad members from Chancellor College and Domasi College in collaboration with our sister organisation, Art & Global Health Center UCLA, on different women’s and gender issues, such as gender discrimination, sexual violence and harassment, reproductive justice, and exploring privileges of being a man/woman.

MASA: Youth brings participatory arts to secondary schools

MASA: Youth brings participatory arts to secondary schools

MASA: Youth focused on college and secondary school students, including any youth living with HIV. We also focused on reaching other adolescents and youth, as they are particularly vulnerable and in need of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) education, HIV prevention programmes, and HIV testing, treatment, and care services.

Make Art / Stop AIDS Goes to Secondary Schools

Make Art / Stop AIDS Goes to Secondary Schools

With 50% of new HIV infections affecting those aged 15 to 17 in Malawi, young people are particularly at risk, due to early sexual activity and marriage. Knowing about the successful efforts of the Make Art / Stop AIDS (MASA) programme in bringing HIV education to hard-to-reach populations, we set out to reach secondary school students through the MASA: Youth project in collaboration with Dignitas International.

From Science to Art, Affecting Social Change

From Science to Art, Affecting Social Change

Geoffrey Kamwendo, a 20-year-old Chancellor College student, may be pursuing his degree in Computer Sciences, but his personal passions lie in the arts. He sings; he acts; he performs poetry. That's part of why he joined the Make Art / Stop AIDS (MASA) Squad: to achieve social change using his artistic skills.

MASA ENGAGES TEACHERS ON SEXUALITY AND GENDER RIGHTS.

MASA ENGAGES TEACHERS ON SEXUALITY AND GENDER RIGHTS.

Gender based Violence (GBV) is one driving force of HIV/AIDS epidemic worldwide. In Malawi GBV cases, especially against women, dominate the headlines. This is due to ignorance on human rights and gender equality. It is evenly noted that lack of comprehensive knowledge on human rights makes many victims of GBV and sexual harassment unaware of any violation. In the same vein, the victims are not even aware of where to seek assistance from. Nonetheless, the fight against HIV and AIDS is contingent on understanding how gender and GBV increase the HIV risk of women, men and children

EMBRACING AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO SRH EDUCATION

EMBRACING AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO SRH EDUCATION

Knowledge of Sexual and reproductive health (SRH), including HIV/AIDS, is fundamentally important to a healthy life, especially among the youth. Consequently, the modern world expects teachers to shed more light on SRH and HIV/AIDS, and other relevant topics in their classrooms. Due to cultural sensitivities, teachers are not freed up to tackle such topics openly and decisively. Worse still, even the general teaching approach spelt in the secondary school curriculum, in this case, leaves a lot to be desired. This all works to the disadvantage of the youth who receive little accurate information about sexuality. This can leave them susceptible to coercion, abuse, unintended pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.